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u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. >> we can reduce that by well over a $100 billion a year. >> the range of new threats include cyber threats, bio threats, and a host of non-state actors. >> how do you do all of this on the budgets we have for the armed forces given the debt situation we have in our own country? >> that's going to be, i think, in many ways the biggest debate within the military, if not, in society at large. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so inter-connected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions i
of the world if the u.s. fails to reach a deal? the u.s. is the world's largest economy, so it performance affects the other economies. -- so its performance affects the other economies. u.s. consumers will not have cash to spend on products from the big exporters. eu countries would be weekend in their fight against the financial crisis across the eurozone -- be weakened in their fight against the financial crisis across the eurozone. one economist says it is likely that president obama will negotiate a temporary deal. >> the importance of the u.s. this cliff is extremely -- u.s. fiscal cliff is extremely high. the main growth engines are firstly china, which will grow at about 8%. the u.s. is still very important. we are expecting growth of about 2%. if the u.s. goes off of this book with and you have very weak growth, that will be a huge dent in the global outlook and will have transmission of sex to the rest of the global economy at that time when the eurozone is still in recession in japan has also slid into recession. the risk is that this negotiation process could be protracted. i t
in the u.s., but we did it and we were condemned by the u.s., the state department. we were condemned by the u.n. years later, people appreciated the grave issue he took was for the benefit of the american people. because then you invade iraq come you are able to go into iraq without the risk of the iraqi nuclear. thus go back to 1973. i'm sure some jewish people and the audience and for us, the jewish people yom kippur is the holiest day of the year, where we go to the shore, we pray 1973 turn yom kippur. even though i thought i knew everything before i wrote the book. when i was doing the research i learned myself a lot. i found out 1973 congress by surprise, were almost an appointment would've lost the war. in the middle of the war, we can go to the sea. it's not the war in vietnam or afghanistan. it means rout of the game to make it to a crucial point in the first day of the war that we were invaded from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, t
to 2030. they say the u.s. won't be the world's only superpower. the council says china will pass the u.s. economically a few years before 2030. the council's analysts say the u.s. will remain unrivaled in its ability to orchestrate all aspects of power including the military it the analysts say the japanese economy will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china w
they found in lebanon. al jazeera. northeastern lebanon. >> eight u.s. soldiers are suing the tokyo and to power co. for alleged radiation exposure. they claim it lied about the threat posed by leaks after the march 2011 earthquake and tsunami. the damp -- that they missed the fukushima nuclear plant. heavy 8 were involved in relief operations in areas around the plant. japan piece in the government says it whalers are heading out to the sea but only carrying out research. the main group departed on the annual hunt in the southern ocean surrounding antarctica. japan introduced scientific whaling to avoid a commercial willing than under a 1986 moratorium. a man and australia survived being mauled by a shark. he was serving in new south wales. he lost a finger and chunk of his five. putting on a brave face for the cameras but shark attacks are unusual this time of year. >> the dolphins swimming all around him and all of the sudden the sharp just comes up and took for the chunks out of him and then he'd actually put the nose of the board into the bull shark's head. >> did a marvelous j
speaker did give us one flash of hope if you listen to his words very carefully. the u.s. is updating its military plans against syria as new intelligence shows assad's regime is loading sarin gas into bombs. and president obama's pot problem. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm tom foreman in for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, the magic number after a whole week of harsh words here in washington and threats too, did house speaker john boehner hint ever so slightly at a compromise today that could finally edge us away from the dreaded fiscal cliff? it comes down to tax rates. this is a huge sticking point in the stalled negotiations between the president and mr. boehner. obama says the top rate on household income above $250,000 should rise from 35% to 39.6%. boehner wants the rate to stay at 35% or even lower. but what about meeting in the middle? around 37%? listen carefully to the speaker when he was asked today whether that rate could be the answer to this impasse. >> there are a lot of things that are possible. to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it's going t
. the longer this goes on, the bigger that challenge is. >> is your warning for u.s. action or action in conjunction? >> the secretary is urgently meeting with russian representatives and lots of elements of the state department are meeting with our alies. the potential for recognition of the new syrian national council is something we would be doing, a step our alies have taken. i commend ambassador ford for their leadership on the plementic side to deal with this grinding, painful, two-year-long conflict. the differences are far less important than the commonality, which the president has made a clear declaration, which we will back. thank you. captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> you are going to hear from senator leiberman at the foundation for defense of democracy. they are hosting a forum called "dictators and dissidents." we'll take you live to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will b
less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. syrian state television showed >> woodruff: for more on all of this we turn to vitaly churkin, russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe
and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> the democrats are better regarded in this negotiation than the republicans by a lot. >> warner: plus ray >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. b
troops on it is side of the militarize zone separating from south korea. as well as nearly 30,000 u.s. forces. not only are they within strikes distance of the launch site, a long-range rocket shows north korea is on its way to developing technology to launch a rocket at the united states's west coast and hawaii. officials tell cnn that the working assumption is that the north koreans got outside help from others, including iran. so today's launch is raising some huge concerns. let's go to our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. i assume they are pretty surprised and alarmed by the successful launch over at the pentagon? >> look, wolf, because of everything you just mentioned, indeed, the u.s. military, the intelligence committee have been watching north korea for days now 24/7 because they did expect to launch and they announced it. but they were having technical problems so a lot thought it wouldn't happen until next week. when it happened last week, there was a surprise. the north korean anchor's excitement was clear. >> announcing the launch of a long-range rocket that put a nor
with politics and public affairs, we casey jennings live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watched key public policy defense. every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs, get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should n
prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united
. the u.s. is hardly alone -- u.b.s. is hardly alone in having to pay. >> caught trying to manipulate important interest rates and punished with 940 million pounds of fines and confiscation of ill-gotten gains. >> this is some of the most shocking behavior we have seen to date. this was prevalent across the firm for five years when people were seeking to manipulate an internationally used benchmark used for millions and trillions of pounds of contracts in order to benefit their own trading position. >> u.b.s. traders colluded with other firms in market rigging. one u.b.s. a banker said to a broker, let me do one humongous deal. i will pay $100,000, whatever you want. i am a man of my word. the bank has been punished by switzerland, the u.k., and the u.s. >> make no mistake. for u.b.s. traders, the manipulation of libor is about getting rich. as one broker told a derivatives trader, you are getting bloody good at this game. think of me when you are on your yacht in monaco, won't you? >> it is a 1 billion pound fine too much or too little or about right? >> it is not about the fine. wha
. and the head of the u.s. gold lobby goes on -- the u.s. gun lobby goes on television to defend his position that guns should be in every school. and trouble in south africa. hello there. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. it turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are reported to have died when the bakery they were queuing at was destroyed. the un envoy arrived in syria for more talks. we have this. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago, this area was under the control of government forces. the rebels recently opened a new battle for this section of central syria. the state still has superior firepower to the strike back. the government says it is willing to engage in dialogue, but the other side is not. >> i have general advice. time is getting short. hurry and move toward us. these military efforts to topple the government are not getting rid of the president or occupying the c
in u.s. history. president obama defeated mitt romney forcing the republicans to reconsider their policies among others returning women and immigrants. while the major party presidential candidate did not take on fossil fuel, climate change in any of their debates, it was a year of extrem e weathr from melting of the arctic to superstorm sandy to the massive typhoon in the philippines. 2012 will also be remembered for a series of mass shootings from aurora, arata, to the sikh temple, to be shooting in newtown, conn.. the case around trayvon martin sparked national protest after officials refused to arrest george zimmerman. president obama continues his secret drone wars. we spend the hour looking back at the moment and movements that shaped 2012. >> democratic congresswoman gabrielle giffords has announced she will step down this week. she was shot in the head last year in a shooting spree that left six people dead in tucson. >> thank you for your prayers and for giving me the time to recover. i have more work to do on my recovery, so i will do what is best for arizona. i wi
this hour about an urgent national security issue. u.s.-led efforts to try to track down and eliminate loose nuclear weapons. that's coming up. >>> also, frightening now revelations about an al qaeda plot for a three-part terror attack on the united states embassy in iman, jordan. i'll ask the country's foreign minister for details. he's standing by live. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin this afternoon with brand-new republican offers to try to save the $2.2 trillion and avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. the across-the-board spending cuts and sharp tax increases that hit in just 29 days. let's get straight to our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. she's watching what's going on. dana, the tax rates, first of all, let's get to a major sticking point right now. there's been a counterproposal from house republicans to the white house. you have details. >> reporter: that's right. let's start exactly where you just began on those tax rates because that has become the big divide between the two sides. the answer is the house republicans are not budging. the
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the london hospital where the duchess of cambridge was being treated and tricked a nurse to get details about her condition. two days later, that nurse, 46-year-old jacintha saldanha, took h
of the key city aleppo. some rebels named by the u.s. state department terrorists. they designated a terrorist group linked to al qaeda in iraq. the department imposed sanctions. what does it mean to sort out good rebels from bad? nick paton walsh explains. >> reporter: not only look different, black flags, well armed and disciplined, they fight differently, too. using suicide tactics and mass casualty car bombs, radical extremists but undeniably effective. behind a stream of rebel victories, overrunning regime bases across syria, many thinking the end of assad is nearer than ever. why has the united states, who also want assad gone, black listed them as terrorists? >> we've had concerns that al nusra is little more than a front for al qaeda in iraq who has moved some of its operations into syria. >> reporter: that link clear in the document filed monday, al nusra deemed not a new group, another name for al qaeda in iraq. u.s. officials believing insurgents who kill americans in iraq fighting for rebels against assad. this move may make sense in principle but, say experts now, less
pentagon correspondent, jim miklaszewski. good evening very >> reporter: good evening, brian, u.s. officials tell us that the syrian military is poised tonight to use chemical weapons against its own people. and all it would take is the final order from syrian president assad. as the fighting grows more intense and syrian rebels close in on damascus, the syrian regime has turned very desperate. u.s. officials tell nbc news the syrian military has now loaded the precursor for bombs, that could be dropped from dozens of fighter bombers. this week, u.s. intelligence detected a flurry of activity like this one, near homs today, while u.s. officials confirm the today, while u.s. officials confirm the precursor chemicals are loaded, they must still be mixed together to create the deadly gas. the alarm shook the world, including president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton issued strong warnings to syria's president assad, there would be strong consequences if he used chemical weapons. >> it is the point of no return there would be strong consequences if >> they would lose any
as an independent. he ran for the u.s. senate two years ago as an independent but lost to marco rubio and served as governor of florida as a republican. sum are speculating crist made this latest move in preparation for a run against incumbent florida governor rick scott in 2014. >>> lawmakers want answers about what that deadly depth seventh attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya is all about. soon they may hear from secretary of state hillary clinton. she will testify before a house committee on a state department report expected next week. u.s. ambassador to libya chris stevens and three other americans were killed when the consulate was stormed three months ago. >>> in britain, a prank call from an australian radio station to the hospital treating the duchess of cambridge has turned tragic. two deejays called the hospital, tricked a nurse to get information about katherine's condition. well, that nurse was found dead friday of an apparent suicide. she leaves behind a husband and two children. > the two deejays are suspended and the ceo of the station's parent company says he's confi
and democratic representative lynn woolsey of california. we will also show you a tribute in the u.s. house to outgoing caliber and california members of cameras.. join us at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. later a look at the dodd-frank law and regulations. >> this is c-span3 with politics and public affairs programming throughout the week. and every weekend, 40 hours a people and events ,-com,-com ma telling the american story on american history tv. get schedules in the past programs our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> tomorrow a draft constitution by mohammed morsi. it would expand his constitutional powers. supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi. next, we'll talk about developments in the country and security throughout the region with an expert on the muslim brotherhood and a former israeli ambassador to egypt. this is an hour and a half. >> looking at the political competition with the egyptian and the egyptian society, what is likely to be the outcome, not just of the referendum, but the next step in the next several steps in this ongoi
rice's because of her comments about that attack on the outpost in benghazi. terrorists killed our u.s. ambassador to it libya chris stevens and three other americans on september 11th of this year. three days later ambassador rice went on the talk show circuit and said several times u.s. officials believed the violence was a spontaneous reaction over protests to anti-muslim video not a preplanned terrorist attack. intelligence officials say they gave her those talking points but those opponents did not back down and today ambassador rice sent the letter to the president, quote: i am now convinced that the confirmation process would be lengthy, disruptive and costly to you and to our most pressing national and international priorities. that tradeoff is simply not worth it to our country, end quote. we have team fox coverage now. catherine herridge is live on capitol hill where lawmakers got another classified briefing on benghazi today. first though to ed henry live at the white house. ed, what's the reaction there? good evening, harris. there is disappointment here because i said ove
for the organized labor movement in the u.s., passage for this law in michigan would be a body blow to the labor movement in the u.s., wolf. >> certainly would be. thanks very much for that, jessica. >>> the president's due back here in washington just in a little while from michigan. his focus will be back on trying to get a deal with the house speaker john boehner over taxes and spending cuts. our chief political analyst gloria borger is here to take a closer look at the agreements, the disagreements, i guess there's more disagreements than agreements. let's step back and see where these two sides stand, gloria. >> let's step back from the cliff here for a minute, wolf. and you'll see that on tax, which is of course the crux of this matter, there's a huge difference between congressional republicans who want to raise $800 billion over ten years from tax increases. and of course the white house that wants to, you know, basically double that. i mean, the white house says, we need to get more revenue from taxes. if you break apart these tax number, take a look, because of course we know, the big
of its spies in the u.s. must be released first. >> the united states government refuses with the cuban government to achieve a solution. >> when senator cardinal was asked about that on cbs. >> they're totally different cases. what cuba has to do is release alan gross. >> that doesn't mean they can't sit down and try and talk again and again and try until they reach something. >> what might break the stalemate is the end of the presidential campaign. mr. obama carried florida's cuban america vote. they want the white house to take it. >> the administration has been visited by us to make it clear that this needs to be a high priority. we got to get alan gross back. >> alan gross is 63 years old and his family says he has health problems. he is serving a 15 year prison sentence. >> thanks so much. those five cubans were arrested in the u.s. in 1998. the castro government admits they were spying, but refers to them as heros. >>> anti-apartheid icon nelson mandella has been admit today a hospital in south africa. mandella is undergoing
to talk about the inspiration for his trip at 9 p.m. eastern. >> u.s. intelligence officials said wednesday that the syria military head loaded the precursor chemicals for a deadly nerve gas into bombs, and, thursday, a bipartisan group of senators expressed support for the obama administration's regime over the use of bilogical weapons. senators spoke to reporters for 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator lieberman, senator coons, and senator graham, and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weaponnized stores of chemical and bilogical agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggest they are in waiting quarters waiting to use the weapons. in true, this may men that the united states and our allies facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction in syria, and this may be the last worng we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close, and we may instead be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the sidelines and hope a m
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
think it was on friday -- in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might have learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent yes, but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is in full existential mode. they're extremely paranoid. they believe that opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti- democratic and are out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimately elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's why essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is -- and brotherhood leaders actually told me this -- is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti- democratic, but the normal rules of politics are suspended until future notice because we are in this fundamental turning point, and this is what we have to do.
news coming in to us. according to the u.s. geological survey, a magnitude 7.3 magnitude earthquake strug off the coast of japan. a tsunami warning has been issued. i know it was felt very strongly there, alex. what can you tell us? >> well, atika, you mentioned some of the details. we were sitting in the office here in our bureau in tokyo, up on the ninth floor of this building. it's hard to describe, you can't really describe the feeling until you're into it. the one thing that grips me, i'm relatively new to living here in japan is the noise more than everything. everything basically shaking violently, our filing cabinets shaking. here's what i can tell you. you mentioned the 7.3 earthquake. a few other details just coming in. there are advisories -- pardon me, i'm looking off my notes. there are advisories for japan, but the pacific tsunami warning center has not issued a further alert beyond that. right now they're keeping it just to japan. we are hearing reports of possibly as much as a two-meter high tsunami warning in miagi prefecture. this is along the same fault lines, rig
and there is an american connection. u.s. officials are working to figure out if the man played a part in the attack on the consulate in libya that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador. the egyptians say their suspect is the leader of a terror network. we're working our sources for you, so stay tuned, live on cnn. >>> and egypt's president could be backing off a power group that led to a national crisis. mohamed morsy says he is willing to change the decree that critics say would give him too much power. the offer would not be enough, though, to satisfy the egyptians furious. at least six people have died in clashes, we'll bring you to cairo for the latest on that. >>> and president obama and house speaker john boehner are talking again. but that is about the only thing close to progress in efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff. president obama used his weekly address insisting he is ready to make the tough decisions on spending cuts. >> i am willing to make more entitlement spending cuts on top of the one trillion in spending cuts i signed into law last year. but if we're serious about
weeks the u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the united states changed course, and so at that meeting, truman meets molotov -- first meet with advisers and they're divided. marshall, leahy, are all telling him don't break with the soviets. said to the secretary of war and said, the soviets have a much better understand of their open security, especially around poland, than we do. >> stepping back from the details, do you think it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each of whom had, i think, it's fair to say, an empire, one formal, one a little more informal, because the soviets had different, smaller states under their control, and going to keep control of the baltic states and moving into eastern europe. was it realistic for these two powers, who are very different, to really get along for very long or were they really destined to have a cold war and luckily never really had a hot war except through proxies. so details are important, an
have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
authority this that country, many are asking what this may mean in terms of u.s. involvement. but senior administration officials said there's still no plans to arm this group. yet the government hasn't ruled it out. the other issue on the forefront on the president's mind, the u.s. economy and that pending fiscal cliff. are we going to go over the fiscal cliff? >> you know, i remain optimistic that there are enough people of good will in this town that recognize our economy will be much better off, american families will be much better off if we get this done. the most important thing we can do is make sure middle class taxes don't go up on january 1. and i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high income individuals. >> prediction, are you going to be able to raise taxes, yes or no? >> taxes are going to go up one way or another. and i think the key is to make sure that taxes go up on the high end individuals like you and me, barbara. we can afford it. it is entirely possible for us to come up with a deal, but time
. crist ran for the u.s. senate as an independent in 2010, but was defeated by marco rubio. some are speculating this move is in preparation for another run for governor against rick scott in 2014. >>> the supreme court has decided to take up two major same-sex marriage cases. the first is the defense of marriage act. the 1996 law denies federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples. right now around 120,000 legally married same-sex couples in the u.s. the second is california's proposition 8. that made same-sex marriage illegal in the state. a decision on these cases is expected next year. >>> is this the end of gangnum style mania? korean pop star psy which is the most watched video in youtube history is apologizing for an anti-american lyrics that aired in 2004. made its way around online. it included lyrics calling for the deaths of american troops serving in iraq. in his apology he said his performance was emotionally charged and, "while i'm grateful for the freedom to express one self, i learn there is some limits to what language is appropriate and i'm deeply sorry
that the first wave of troops were u.s. marines. they wanted to bring their own helicopters, the own logistics. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security team and senior people at the state department, over the whole question of what is it wise to try to broach potential peace talks with the taliban. we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting a common person to try to achieve the present school in the country. >> who is summer? >> so, she is a young american woman who come and there she is on the bottom right, who had extensive foreign development experience and put her hand up to go to afghanistan. to try to rebuil
in the treaty that interferes with u.s., federal or state laws, nothing. that didn't stop mr. santorum to send out this e-mail to supporters after the vote saying you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you, the u.s. senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of person with disability. he went on to say, quote, this treaty would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. again, that's not true. why the fudging of facts? we asked senator santorum on the program tonight. he declined, and like the others that won't explain themselves, we can guess their motivations and frankly it's so baffling we're taking wide guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr. is a health care attorn
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
act now to avoid economic disaster in the u.s. women march for peace and the central african republic as advancing rebels prepare for talks with the government. 4 die when a russian airplane crashes onto the highway in moscow. >>> for 13 days, doctors had fought to keep her alive but her injuries were too severe. now the six men accused of gang raping the 23-year-old woman in india are being charged with murder. she was thrown from a moving bus after being assaulted. thousands of people have called for more to be done to protect indian women against sexual violence. from new delhi, we have this report. >> they came and the hundreds to mourn the young woman brutalized and to show their anger to lawrence the authorities who have not year -- show their anger towards the authorities. the chief minister had already described it as a shameful moment for india, but that did not spare them the rest of the crowd. >> we need to do something because we have too much on the establishment and they have let us down. >> the government has been trying to put off protesters by sealing off large parts
. although the u.s. could extend its nuclear umbrella to other nations and there so that obviates that need, but still isn't deterrent working through the cold war something that can also be applied to iran or a number of other nuclear regimes? >> the short answer is question. deterrents can work and of course it did work. it becomes harder many on many as compared with one-on-one. the u.s. and the soviet union became quite experienced in how to handle mutually assured destruction if you like. or mutual deterrents. when you have a number of -- many nations butting up against each other physically essentially, and with much less experience in handling the issue of deterrents, i think the risks become higher. and if as you suggest proliferation is likely to become more widespread, if iran actually gets nuclear capability, i think the risks are very high. i'm rather pessimistic because it does seem to me that one way or another, a local nuclear war could break out and has a fairly high probability of breaking out. and when it happens, if it happens, the destruction will be very great. i'm a --
authorizing u.s. companies to the best of their pension funds, doing business with iran's energy sector. february of this year he offered a bipartisan resolution passed by unanimous vote of the senate for iran's right to freedom of assembly, speech and due process. day earlier iranians had taken to the street in peaceful demonstrations against the government or pressed by the siege of militia men. in times of peace and conflict he has traveled to the region to preserve the interests of our allies. in july he led a foundation to the middle east to discuss the ongoing threat posed by iran to review developments in the middle east peace process and traveled to saudi arabia, iraq, israel, lebanon, egypt, he met with u.s. troops in iraq and kuwait and iraq with vice president joe biden and general commander of u.s. troops, during the fighting in gaza. senator kc --casey has said we must prevent hamas, israel has the right to set up a naval blockade, key weapons to hamas and responsibility to protect its homeland. hamas is a terrorist organization that denies israel's right to exist and indis
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